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Pilgrim House

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship

Older Programs

This page contains program descriptions older than the past year with the oldest programs first.

2011

March 27, 2011 - Turmoil in the Middle East and Beyond

Tom Hanson, retired Foreign Service Officer, will discuss the events underway across the Middle East, as well as Chinese concerns that protests might spread to their country. Tom Hanson has a unique ability to illuminate current foreign policy tensions in their historical context. Tom is a popular speaker for our Great Decisions program.

April 3 - KIDPOWER with Rachael Kroog

Rachael was one of our summer programs, and people requested that we get her back for an intergenerational program during the year. For the past 20 years, Rachael Kroog has been a Twin Cities favorite for family entertainment. In addition to numerous television and radio appearances, Rachael has performed at over 1500 elementary schools, churches, and special events across the country with her motivational KIDPOWER. Show. Rachael got her start performing throughout Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom singing and dancing and also played the part of Mary Poppins and Pluto during the Mickey Mouse Parade.

April 10 – Music from Clifton and Bettye Ware

Clifton Ware is Professor Emeritus of Music at the University of Minnesota, author of numerous books, and recorded singer and performer. Bettye is his wife - accomplished pianist, organist, piano teacher, song arranger, chorister (Plymouth Congregational Church), and editor of Cliff’s books. They have produced a new program of Eco-songs and Cliff will visited Pilgrim House for one of our programs earlier this year and decided he would like to do his world premier in our fellowship.

April 17 – George Erickson – Global Warming

George is an author of a number of books including True North, Eyes Wide Open, and Time Traveling with Science and Saints. He is the former president of the Minnesota Humanists and has spoken at Pilgrim House a number of times before. He has always been well received with requests that we have him return. He is a retired world traveler who has personally witnessed the catastrophic results of our global warming.

April 24 – Spring Celebration

This will be our typical spring celebration. We are looking for members who would like to share their words, songs, or dance, whatever you would be willing and able to share with the fellowship. Please contact Lollie, Debbie, David, or Mel to let us know what you would like to share. There will be a potluck brunch following the program.

May 1 – Doug Wood

Doug Wood is a Minnesota author, musician, artist, naturalist, and wilderness guide. He has written both classic children’s books like Old Turtle and great adult books like Fawn Island and Paddle Whisperers. He is that Renaissance man who, when he is talking instead of playing, you want him to play, and when he is playing instead of talking you want him to talk. He has been a favorite at Pilgrim House for a number of years in a row, only asking that we book him in the spring rather than the middle of winter. He has another function on the 1st so he will be a Pilgrim House early for those who may want to talk or buy items, but he will have to leave directly after the program.

May 8 - Finding Neighborhood and Community in Changing Times

Evelyn Klein will discuss how neighborhood and community impact on our lives in today’s changing times. Although we may regard them primarily as localities with demographic and political borders, they are much more than that. They can be places of nurture and growth, of shared interests and purposes once we make the connection.

May 15 – George Washington

The Minnesota Historical Society is running a special exhibit on our first president. Dan Spock of the Historical Society will be at Pilgrim House to give us a sample of the exhibit, a bit of information on George Washington, and encourage us to come to the historical society to see the exhibit in its last month.

May 22 - Louis Asher: The Five Reasons Why Clean Renewable Energy Is So Critically Needed

Many people are aware that global warming is a critical reason for needing clean renewable energy. There are at least four other strong reasons including: acidification of the oceans from CO2, health reasons such as mercury contamination from burning coal, national security, and economics.

May 29 – No Program (Memorial Day Weekend)

June 5 – Flower Communion and Annual Meeting

Bring a flower from your garden for our traditional Flower Communion program. To keep that day moving we will move acknowledgments and thanks you’s over lunch (Taco bar and beverages provided by the board; pot luck items provided by everyone else) followed by the Annual Meeting.

June 19 - King Tut

The Science Museum of Minnesota has the King Tut exhibit. Someone from the museum will be with us to explain the importance of King Tut and will preview the items on display in the exhibit. It will be a good program for the whole family and the whole community.

July 17 - Animals Nobody Loves - Skunks, Porcupines, Raptors

August 21 - Mooncoin Ceili Dancers - Irish Dance Program

See their web page http://www.mooncoinceili.com/ for more information on this dance group.

September 11 - Water Communion – We begin each year with this tradition.

Throughout the year, members of the fellowship collect samples of water from various places they go to, ranging from vacations to events at home. At the service, the samples of water are placed in a bowl and allowed to mix involving the entire fellowship in each others stories and creating a more inclusive group. So bring your water and share it and your stories with other members of the fellowship

September 18 - The Transformational Power of Love – Lisa Wersal

Most other faith traditions we often speak of love, even equating God to love. UU seem to prefer reason and ethical grounding for emotions or sentiments. But Love is not an emotion that lends itself to a reasoned approach. UU’s have developed a shared commitment through the program “Standing on the side of Love” Lisa explores Love and how it fits for us UU’ers.

September 25 - The world water problem – Bill Easter

In our survey of members there was a desire to have a program on the world problem of water. UUSC has begun a program to make fellowships more aware of the world water problem. We have within our fellowship one of the world leaders on the topic. Bill will discuss the world need for clean water and how climate change is affecting its availability.

October 2 - Libraries of Minnesota by Doug Ohmann

Doug Ohmann is a wonderful Minnesota photographer who chronicles the important things in Minnesota. He has published books including churches of, school of, courthouses of and now Libraries of Minnesota. He will tell us about some of the great libraries in Minnesota, stories of how the pictures were taken. He will be available to sign this book and a number of others.

October 9 - History of Western Religion – J. B. Shank Professor of Religion University of Minnesota

As part of the survey of members there was a request for someone to give us a historical breakdown of western religion and we went to the best source of information on the topic. Dr. Shank teaches this very topic at the University of Minnesota

October 30 – Mark Ritche - The Minnesota Elections

Mark Ritchie is the Minnesota Secretary of State and a Unitarian Universalist. He will speak not only about elections, but also about UU’s participation in the public forum.

November 6 - The National Debt and a Solution – Mel Aanerud

Mel has taken a historical look at the national debt because some of it becomes more economic than historical, he had his paper vetted by the University of Minnesota – We as a nation have always been in debt, but it is larger now than ever. How can we ever pay it off?

The program will be followed by Soup Sunday and the annual Harvest Fest Celebration.

November 13 - The Kayak Lady

Mary Shideler has kayaked every lake in Itasca County (1007 lakes) and has written a book about her adventures and the personal growth that adventure provided her.

November 20 - Our Traditional Pilgrim House Thanksgiving Celebration

Our PH Thanksgiving program is a not-to-be-missed time of celebration and community, bringing together Pilgrim House members and friends with special music, a performance by the Pilgrim House Chorale, seasonal readings and poetry, ... and more. If you or younger members of your family have a musical selection you’d like to share, please contact Bill Rohde by Sunday 11/13. Similarly, if you have a reading you’d like to share, please contact Mel Aanerud. And don’t forget to bring a a dish to pass for our traditional pot luck feast immediately after the program. See you there!

This will be our traditional Thanksgiving program. Those who are interested in participation should contact Bill Rohde or Mel Aanerud.

November 27 - Best Reads

Periodically we put together a program where the members of the fellowship can share books that they have read. Contact Lollie Jensen or Mel Aanerud if you have a book to share.

December 4 - Tribute to Ursula

Debbie Legan’s Mother recently passed away and those who attended her service thought that the story was so touching that it should be heard by the entire fellowship.

December 11 – Immigration Policy

The expert on United States Immigration Policy in our area is Professor Katherine Fennelly - immigration specialist with the Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota (http://www.hhh.umn.edu/people/kfennelly/). Immigration policy will be the major action item at the Unitarian Universalist General Assembly in Phoenix, Arizona next June. UUA asked each fellowship to conduct a number of programs to better understand this issue.

Slides from her presentation are available at http://www.hhh.umn.edu/people/kfennelly/pdf/ten_myths_immigration.pdf.

December 18 – Annual Pilgrim House Holiday Celebration!

Please join us for our always-special intergenerational Pilgrim House Holiday program, complete with group caroling, favorite holiday readings, seasonal music, a performance by the PH Chorale, a special guest (possibly from the far north), favorite foods, and more. Contact Bill Rohde by December 11th if you or the youth in your household have special music or a reading to share. And don’t forget to bring that favorite holiday food for our traditional potluck finger foods feast after the program. See you there!

This program is the time to turn in your contributions to Guest at Your Table for the UUSC.

Parking at PH: PH has limited parking for large events (such as the Holiday Celebration). When coming to PH for a large event, consider parking across Highway 96 in the Arden Hills City Hall lot.

December 25 – no program

2012

January 1, 2012 – Traditional Tolling of the Bells

The first program of each calendar year is our opportunity to remember those who have passed from us the previous year or for that matter for remembering anyone we wish to remember. Contact Mel Aanerud or David Conradi-Jones if you wish to participate. You do not have to make prior arrangements to do so, but it does help in scheduling time.

Note that Soup Sunday is next week this month.

January 8 – Minority Business and their Economic Impact on the Entire Community

Lennie Chism is the Executive Director of Springboard Economic Development Corporation an organization designed to encourage risk takers in the minority community to create the businesses and community leaders of tomorrow; Focusing on capacity building through educating, developing and empowering the residents to support and grow businesses.

Soup Sunday follows the program.

January 15 - Why is “What do UU’s believe” the Wrong Question?

“What do Unitarian Universalists believe?” Aren’t we asked that question a lot by family, friends, and/or co-workers? The main problem with this question is the one word, believe, because it doesn’t mean today what it did a few centuries ago. Context is everything. Dana Reynolds, minister at Michael Servetus Unitarian Society in Fridley, presents this program.

January 22 – Brain Development and Public Policies

Alexandra Fitzsimmons and Marcie Jefferys (both with the Children’s Defense Fund MN) will present on brain development and public policies: What is currently known about the impact of adverse experiences in early childhood on the rest of our lifespan, how Minnesota’s current programs often fail to attend to children and their development--even programs and policies ostensibly aimed at the well-being, and ways to incorporate the latest in brain and other research into our public policies, including suggestions for actions interested PH members can take. The Children’s Defense Fund (CDF) is a non-profit child advocacy organization that has worked relentlessly for over 35 years to ensure a level playing field for all children. CDF champions policies and programs that lift children out of poverty; protect them from abuse and neglect; and ensure their access to health care, quality education and a moral and spiritual foundation.

January 29 - Shunning Emotional Intimacy: The Curse of Living Without a Life

John Driggs is an adjunct instructor at Century College in Adult Education and have been for 20 years. He has written a mental health column for the Phoenix newspaper for 25 years. He has been in private practice in St. Paul for 30 years.

February 5 - It Starts When You Say “We”

What does it mean to say “we” in a community of free thought and free faith? What is it that draws us together and keeps us together, despite and across our differences? Drawing from the example of pilots working with whooping cranes in the natural world, we’ll consider the challenges and possibilities of relationship and “living our faith” as Unitarian Universalists.

Presenter: Rev. Karen Hering is consulting literary minister at Unity Church-Unitarian, St. Paul, and currently serves as writer-in-residence at Wisdom Ways Center for Spirituality. She leads programs in congregations and the wider community engaging writing as a spiritual practice and a tool for social action. For more information, visit: http://www.unityunitarian.org/literary-ministry/html.

After the program on Feb. 5, Karen will lead a writing session on community and covenant, see article below.

February 12 - Drumming the Soul Awake

Jaime Meyer is returning to Pilgrim House to lead us in a drumming session. He will provide instruments for those who want one, or you may bring your own.

Jaime Meyer’s eclectic background includes earning a Masters' degree in theology and the arts from United Seminary of the Twin Cities and studies with a variety of shamanic teachers. His book Drumming The Soul Awake is an often funny and touching account of his journey to become what some call an urban shaman. Since 2001 he has led popular group drumming events around the Twin Cities including five years of sold-out Winter Solstice ceremonies. Jaime’s website is http://www.drummingthesoulawake.com/.

February 19 - Birds in Flight

Presented by Carrol Henderson who is DNR Nongame Wildlife program supervisor and author of Birds in Flight, Woodworking for Wildlife: Homes for Birds and Mammals, and several other books. See his website http://www.hendersonbirding.com/index.html.

February 26 - Dances of George Washington

In celebration of Washington’s 280th birthday, PH members will present a program of 18th-century dances and songs to highlight General Washington’s life and times. They will be led by Charlie Rusnacko who has been studying and teaching dance the last forty years. "We wish all those who have a relish for so agreeable and innocent an amusement all the pleasure the {dancing} season will afford them...I am your most humble servant, Geo. Washington, Mt. Vernon, 12th November, 1799."

March 4 - Standing on the Side of Love - Adam Gerhardstein

Most UU members have encountered the Standing on the Side of Love campaign which champions acceptance and fairness for all. Standing on the Side of Love is a public advocacy campaign that seeks to harness love’s power to stop oppression. The campaign is sponsored by the Unitarian Universalist Association.

Soup Sunday and the Annual Pilgrim House Auction follow the program.

March 11 - Do People Really Understand What the Bible Says?

People interpret the Bible through their own biases and personal motives. In order to truly understand the Bible one needs to be an expert on the lives and times of the people who wrote it. This includes understanding the colloquial phrases, politics, family life, humor, the architecture, etc, etc. Very few people have such expertise.

Louis Asher is a retired Researcher/Statistician and instructor. He worked at 3M Co. for 39 years and was known as a very practical, motivating and extremely entertaining/fun instructor. He now volunteers in organizations that deal with habitat conservation, climate change and renewable energy. In the 1970's Louis had taught Sunday School at Mount Zion Temple in St. Paul with an emphasis on two subjects: the Old Testament and Comparative Religions.

March 18 - For Love of Lakes

Darby Nelson is Professor Emeritus at Anoka-Ramsey Community College, an aquatic Biologist, a former state legislator and former board president of Conservation Minnesota. He has written the book For the Love of Lakes. It weaves history, science and poetry for all who love lakes and enjoy nature writing. He is being touted as the Henry Thoreau of Lakes

March 25 - Addressing Child Malnutrition

Larry Carpenter is the executive director of Toddler Food Partners. They provide knowledge, equipment and hands-on training to make a Ready to Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF) that has helped thousands of toddlers become healthy and go on to live a normal productive life.

April 1 – Introduction to Ethiopia: The Nation and Church, with Dawit Getachew

Dawit was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and came to the U.S. in 1990. He is a naturalized citizen, and earned his B.A. degree from Metro State University. He is now an independent computer programmer. He is a member of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church.

April 8 – Spring Celebration – From the Equinox to the Easter Bonnet

Time honored to current traditions – From the Equinox and the Resurrection to the Easter egg, the Easter bunny and the Easter bonnet - How did we come to celebrate this time of the year as we do? We are looking for members to present prepared material – Contact Mel Aanerud or Lollie Jensen.

April 15 – Urban Turkeys, with Karl Tinsley

Karl’s research examines the behavioral response and possible adaptation strategies of wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) to urban landscape features. What has allowed turkeys to successfully colonize and expand their range? We have seen them in our Pilgrim House yard. They have successfully established themselves on the urban landscape. Do we need controls and what would those be? Karl is a PhD at the University of Minnesota and has directed the study of the Urban Turkey.

April 22 – Did our Founding Fathers create a Christian Nation?

Conservatives claim that our founding fathers created a Christian nation. We will hear from George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, whom we can all respect as founding fathers. They will discuss this topic, in their own words.

April 29 – Personalities of the Presidential Candidates, with Aubrey Immelman

Can we test the personality of the candidates for president and have an insight into what kind of a chief executive they will be? This is the interesting research that Professor Immelmann is involved in, and he will share his findings with us.

Aubrey Immelmann is a Professor of Personality at St. John’s University, Dept. of Psychology.

May 6 – The Decline of Science, with Shawn Otto

Shawn Lawrence Otto is a science advocate and humanitarian who works for smarter politics on a global scale. He is an author and film maker; he co-produced of the Oscar-nominated film House of Sand and Fog. He is the husband of State Auditor Rebecca Otto. We have had him at Pilgrim House before, talking about the decline of Science – he has now written a new book on the topic.

May 13 – History of the Christian Church since 1500 with B. J. Shank

Professor Shank was at Pilgrim House in October and gave us the early history of the Christian Church. There was a desire to have him back to tell us the continuing history of the Christian Church – he is professor of Religion at the University of Minnesota.

May 20 – Songs and Stories of the North Wood with Doug Wood

Doug Wood, the author of “old Turtle” and other children and adult books is an annual favorite at Pilgrim House and he returns with the Wild Spirit band to entertain and enlighten us.

May 27 – no program (Memorial Day weekend)

June 3 – Flower Communion Followed by the Annual Meeting

Bring a flower from your garden for our traditional Flower Communion program. To keep that day moving we will move acknowledgments and thanks you’s over lunch (Taco bar and beverages provided by the board; pot luck items provided by everyone else) followed by the Annual Meeting.

June 24 – Real Pirates – from the Science Museum of Minnesota – Jim Holte

The untold story of the Whydah from Slave Ship to Pirate Ship is the program at the Science Museum of Minnesota. This program for adults and children provides a journey into the exciting world of real pirates and experience their fascinating, true adventures. A treasure trove of genuine artifacts, including authentic pirate treasure last touched by real pirates, will transport you back to an era that lives in legend.

July 15 – Ragamala Dance Troup - Bharatanatyam Historical Dances of India

The Indian dance system is the oldest and most comprehensive in the world, and Bharatanatyam is amongst the oldest of its classical forms. With a history that goes back more than 2,000 years, Bharatanatyam has come down through the centuries, originating in the ancient temples of South India. Integrating elements of music, theater, poetry, sculpture, and literature, this multi-dimensional art is part of a dynamic living tradition that offers an infinite scope for understanding and exploring the body, mind, and spirit.

August 12 – Gibbs Farm Museum with Terry Swanson

This is a program for both adults and children – learning about Gibbs Farm Museum in Ramsey County that tells the story of early settlement in our area. Ice cream cones will be served after the program.

September 9 – Water Communion

Our traditional first program of a new year is Water Communion where people bring water that is important to them – Tell us about your summer or some other reason that water is important to you and mix it with the important water of others. Root beer floats will be served after the program.

September 16 – Love-letters to the World: Writing Effective Letters-to-the-Editor

Mother Teresa once described her work this way: "I’m a little pencil in the hand of a writing God, who is sending a love letter to the world.” We UUers are likewise committed and impassioned to harness love’s power to challenge exclusion and oppression, to elevate public conversations and be a force for good. One way to help shape public discourse around key issues of our time is to contribute letters-to-the-editor. Come get useful tips to guide your writing process. Got an opinion? Get it published!

Lisa Wersal taught academic writing to university students, and has been a writer of academic articles, essays, opinion pieces, poetry, and many letters-to-the-editor. She is a regular letter writer to the Pioneer Press and StarTribune, where her letters are published monthly.

September 23 – Sukkot Feast of Tabernacles

Sukkot Feast of Tabernacles is a Biblical holiday celebrated on the 15th day of the month of Tishrei (late September to late October). It is one of the three biblically mandated festivals on which Hebrews were commanded to make a pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem.

September 30 – Voter ID Amendment

Jana Kooren from the Minnesota ACLU will discuss the “Changes to In-Person & Absentee Voting & Voter Registration; Provisional Ballots Amendment” (sometimes called the Voter ID amendment) – What it Will Mean to Our Election System.

October 7 – Ranked Choice Voting in Minnesota – Its Progress and Prospects

Ranked Choice Voting (also known as Instant Runoff Voting), a system of voting that allows voters to rank candidates on the ballot and ensure candidates with a majority of votes, has been used in countries around the world for decades, and more recently for municipal elections in several U.S. cities – including Minneapolis and St. Paul. Other cities in Minnesota are interested in adopting this system as well. On the cusp of a vitally important presidential election, join us for presentation and discussion about this initiative for future city and state elections.

Cheryl Mayberry from FairVote Minnesota will present the pros and cons to this method of electing our officials.

October 14 – Equity and Social Justice

Dr. Heather Hackman has been teaching and training on social justice issues since 1992 and is currently a tenured professor in the Department of Human Relations and Multicultural Education at St. Cloud State University in St Cloud, Minnesota. She has taught courses in social justice and multicultural education, race and racism, heterosexism and homophobia, social justice education, oppression and social change, sexism and gender oppression, class oppression, and Jewish oppression. She consults nationally on issues of deep diversity, equity and social justice and has focused most of her recent training work on issues of racism and white privilege, gender oppression, heterosexism and homophobia, and classism.

October 21 – The Yes that Comes from No

The Reverend Kelli Clement has spoken at Pilgrim House a number of times…she comes today to speak about both the Marriage Amendment and the Voter ID Amendment that will be on the ballot this November. Pilgrim House has taken a stand against these amendments. Kelli will explore these ballot initiatives in the context of our UU Principles.

October 28 – Interfaith Children’s Advocacy Network (iCAN)

Alison Killeen of the Interfaith Children’s Advocacy Network (iCAN) will present on the issues facing children in Minnesota: from childcare to health care, child sex trafficking to the state budget deficit, iCAN advocates on behalf of children’s needs at the state legislature. Join us for an invigorating discussion on how our personal values compel our actions in the public realm, and how you can get involved advocating for children with iCAN.

Alison Killeen is a St. Paul, Minnesota native and received her B.A. from Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, where she studied abroad in South America and developed an interest in theology, ethics, and human rights. Alison also holds a Master in Divinity from Union Theological Seminary in New York City. She has worked for Ecumenical Women at the United Nations, the US Conference for the World Council of Churches, Lutheran Office for World Community, and Idealist.org. Alison is a Member in Discernment pursuing ordination in the Minnesota Conference of the United Church of Christ.

November 4 – A Stream of Light with Rev. John Cummins

John Cummins is minister emeritus of the First Universalist Church of Minneapolis, MN, where he served with distinction as minister from 1963 until his retirement in 1986. The son of the late Dr. Robert Cummins, a former General Superintendent of the Universalist Church of America, John made his own mark on our movement as an outstanding leader, preacher, and pastor. No one knows more about the history of Unitarian Universalism in the Twin Cities then John does. And he will share that knowledge with us.

November 11 – The Songs of War

On Veterans Day we will investigate the changes in music inspired by the wars we have fought, with stories from the veteran’s point of view.

November 18 – Our Traditional Pilgrim House Thanksgiving Celebration

Our PH Thanksgiving program is a time of celebration and community, bringing together Pilgrim House members and friends with special music, a performance by the Pilgrim House Chorale, seasonal readings, poetry ... and more. If you or younger members of your family have a musical selection you’d like to share, please contact Bill Rohde by Sunday 11/11. Similarly, if you have a reading you’d like to share, please contact Mel Aanerud. And don’t forget to bring a dish to pass for our traditional pot luck feast immediately after the program.

November 25 – Mindfulness for Stress Reduction and Engaged Living

The speaker on November 25 will be Michael O’Neal of the Compassionate Ocean Dharma Center. He will be speaking on the practice of mindfulness and its integration into our everyday lives. Michael studied with the late Dainin Katagiri Roshi of the Minnesota Zen Center as well as Thich Nhat Hanh in France. He also completed a training for professionals in Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction with Jon Kabat-Zinn. He and his wife, Joen Snyder O’Neal, have offered courses in mindfulness and Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) for the past twenty years. See http://www.oceandharma.org/ for more information.

December 2 – Political Analysis Update with Professor David Schultz

With the election over, Professor Schultz (professor of political science from Hamline University) will try to explain to us what happened, why, and what short term and long term affects it will have on our lives.

December 9 – Propaganda in Our Information Environment

There are five factors in the current information environment that together constitute a sort of perfect storm for the promotion of certain ideas that serve the interests of powerful people and institutions. That is, they make for a perfect storm for the rise of propaganda.

This program is presented by Jeff Nygard who publishes the independent newsletter Nygard Notes.

December 16 – Authentic Hope with Jack Nelson Pallmeyer

Jack Nelson Pallmeyer, professor of Peace and Justice at the Saint Thomas University, is back at Pilgrim House to talk with us about his new book. In authentic hope is optimism disconnected from reality. The opposite of authentic hope is not despair. The world is at an end as we know it, but a soft landing is possible. We just have to recognize the world as it has changed and understand how to live in the new reality.

December 23 – Pilgrim House Holiday Celebration!

Please join us for our always-special intergenerational PH holiday program, complete with group caroling, favorite holiday readings, seasonal music, a performance by the PH Chorale, a special guest (possibly from the far north), favorite foods, and more. Contact Bill Rohde or Mel Aanerud by December 12th if you or the youth in your household have special music or a reading to share. And don’t forget to bring that favorite holiday food for our traditional potluck finger foods feast after the program. See you there!

December 30 – Tolling of the Bells

Our Tolling of the Bells program on Sunday will reflect on people and events of the year that’s drawing to a close. Our facilitators will recall and honor persons who have passed in 2012. There will be names and profiles of newsmakers, as well as time for attendees to share personal losses held dear. Music and singing will round out this program, which has proven to be a meaningful event for participants over the years.

You can share remembrances spontaneously at the program, or if you’d like to let the facilitators know ahead of time, contact: --Mel Aanerud --David Conradi-Jones

Children will enjoy a game day during the program, or are always welcome to stay with adults.

2013

January 6 – Justice in Common... and in the Commons

We Minnesota UUs have just spent a year very engaged in a common pursuit defending the future freedom to marry. And our denomination has been deep in the struggle for LGBT and immigrant rights, particularly in 2012 but for quite some time now. What are we learning about ourselves, our capacity for justice, and the larger world we inhabit with all our neighbors, as we begin a new year of this vital work?

This program is presented by Ralph Wyman, Director and Organizer of the Minnesota Unitarian Universalist Social Justice Alliance.

January 13 – Clocks and Time

Brent Glommen, an expert on clocks, will discuss clocks, how they work, how they have evolved, some ideas about time, and how clocks have been used. Brent Glommen, of Brent Glommen Clock Repair in Roseville, is a 2nd generation clock person. He has been repairing clocks for 26 years and has taught a class in advanced clock repair.

January 20 – Best Read of the Winter

Join us for a discussion of the best books people have been reading. Come prepared to offer your favorite books of the past few months and to hear what others have been reading. Contact Lollie Jensen if you have a book you would like to present.

January 27 – Tar Sands Oil and the Keystone XL Pipeline

This talk will shed light on the U.S. energy situation as a whole, highlighting tar sands oil and the Keystone XL Pipeline. It will also touch another hot topic, that of fracking. Presented by PH member Louis Asher, a retired Researcher/Statistician and instructor. He worked at 3M Co. for 39 years and was known as a very practical, motivating and extremely entertaining/fun instructor. He now volunteers in organizations that deal with habitat conservation, climate change and renewable energy.

February 3 – A New Era in Unitarian Universalism

Learn about the proposal for “Regionalization” from our Prairie Star District Chair (and resident of Fridley), Kathy Burek. This proposal would merge three districts in the geographic center of the U.S. into one Mid-America Region. Advantages include field staff spending less time on administrative duties and more time on nurturing healthier congregations with leadership support and other services. How it would happen, what the impacts to congregations would be, and more…all from a local knowledgeable leader.

Then, during our Soup Sunday, our own Long Range Planning Committee will present a summary of the results of the discussions with members and friends last fall – and the next steps for using this information to begin preparing an updated five-year plan for Pilgrim House. Sure to be informative!

February 10 – Wall-Busting and Bridge-Building: Hospitality in a Globalized World

Presented by Eleazar S. Fernandez, Professor of Constructive Theology at United Theological Seminary. We are living in a glocalized world. The global is lived locally and the local is lived globally. Given this context, our neighbors are not only those within our immediate locality, but also those in other parts of the world. Ironically, amidst the rhetoric of global village, walls of fear and division are rising, hearts are constricting, and moral imagination shrinking. Faith communities and responsible citizens must respond differently and creatively. What we are called to do is to embody the message of radical hospitality and to participate in the work of enlarging people’s moral imagination.

February 17 – Diaries and Journals from the U.S. Dakota War

This is the 150th anniversary of the U. S. Dakota War. The Minnesota Historical Society has many ways to experience this event. We will use diary and journal entries of people who were there to set the stage, be there in Fort Ridgley, New Ulm and observe the aftermath, all in the words of those who experienced it.

February 24 – Doug Ohman – A Journey from the Headwaters

Award winning photographer, author and story teller Doug Ohman paddled his kayak with camera in hand down the mighty Mississippi from its start at Lake Itasca to the Iowa border. Hear his stories and outstanding images from this journey.

March 3 – The Delphi Trio (followed by our Annual PH Auction)

The Delphi Trio from Michael Servetus UU Church in Fridley will provide a concert of jazz music. Relax to a program of instrumental and vocal delights.

Then enjoy an expanded Soup Sunday and settle in for our always fun fundraiser auction. Check out what Pilgrim House members and friends have contributed for your bidding pleasure.

March 10 – One Journey Through the Universe with Michael Holt

An exploration of how astronomy has played a role in human development. For our ancestors, the changing night sky presented a puzzle. Explaining it, bit by bit, fueled science and changed religion. This legacy is available to us today, if we’ll just find a dark place and look up.

Michael Holt is an occasional amateur astronomer, a longtime UU, and a member of First Universalist Church in Minneapolis.

March 17 – Colleen Bertsch and Szászka Present Music of Transylvania

In the Transylvanian countryside, string bands are used for weddings, dance parties, and self entertainment. These ensembles include at least one violin, a kontra (modified viola) and string bass. Szászka is honored to share examples of Transylvanian string band music from different villages to demonstrate the rich variety of music this region has to offer. Szászka was formed in 1996 to perform traditional Transylvanian village dance music. Sara Bruins and Doug Code, founding members of Szászka, are from Madison, Wisconsin. Colleen joined Szászka in 2006. She lives in Minneapolis and is a PhD student in ethnomusicology at the University of Minnesota.

March 24 – What’s New at the U: The Impact of the University and the Role it Plays in Helping to Advance MN as a State

Mary Kay Delvo, director of advocacy, University of Minnesota Alumni Association presents this program. Representatives from the University of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota Alumni Association went on a road trip, visiting 13 cities in 12 weeks. The purpose of this "road show" was to inform Minnesotans around the state about the importance of University education, research, and outreach to their communities. Have you ever attended a cultural or sports event at the U, ever eaten a Honeycrisp apple or puffed wheat cereal, ever worn a seatbelt? The reach and impact of the U is felt across the entire state, even for those who have never set foot on campus or don’t have a diploma.

March 31 – Spring Celebration

We will be conducting our traditional Spring Celebration with people from the fellowship sharing their talents. The children will depart for a special activity mid-program. We will schedule children’s early and adults later in the program. If you or your children have a talent – music, dance, spoken word – that you would like to share: contact Lollie Jensen or Mel Aanerud.

A potluck spring brunch will follow the program, coordinated by Katrina Edenfeld. All are invited.

April 7 Brief History of the Soul with Professor Charles Taliaferro

Charles Taliaferro is a Professor of Philosophy at St. Olaf College. He is the author or co-author of twenty books including A Brief History of the Soul. Taliaferro has been a visiting scholar at Oxford, Princeton, NYU, and Columbia, He has given lectures at Oxford, Cambridge, University of St. Andrews (Scotland), Yale, NYU, University of Chicago, the Gregorian (Rome), University of Beijing (China), and elsewhere.

April 14 – Hand Me Down My Walking Cane with Author Carla Hagen

I have always been intrigued by lost things: people, places, cultures, as well as lost causes. That was why I felt compelled to write the first fictionalized account of the small communities in my home county, Lake of the Woods, who had been forcibly relocated during the Great Depression. Although the settlers were offered low-interest loans for more desirable farmland, most of them preferred their hardscrabble life in villages built on peat bogs and jack pine sand ridges where they were free to poach deer, grow their food and live their lived free of any mayor, police or clergy. They resisted the move, sponsored by the Resettlement Administration or RA (later the Farm Security Administration or FSA), and that resistance became legend in the borderland where I grew up. Hand Me Down My Walking Cane is their story. The relocation ties these characters together in ways they could never have foreseen as it changes the life and the landscape of the forest villages. My talk will focus on the story and the significance of the relocation in the turbulent, troubled 1930s.

April 21 – How a Norwegian Bachelor Farmer is Saving the Land, and the Lake

When it comes down to it, most of the land and water that is important to conservation is in private ownership. The Minnesota Land Trust will present the story of how one landowner’s decision to NOT develop his property is inspiring people to rethink the real value of land. The Minnesota Land Trust is a non-profit conservation organization dedicated to preserving our state’s natural and scenic heritage. http://www.mnland.org Presented by Barbara LaMotte, Marketing & Membership Manager, Minnesota Land Trust.

April 28 – Creativity and Innovation Presented by Louis Asher

A fun-filled, interactive and thought-provoking presentation. Attendees will be gently challenged to use their creative abilities in ways that lead to innovative and fun solutions. Real-life creative and innovative problem-solving examples will be discussed. The talk will feature a number of interactive activities.

"If at first an idea is not absurd, then there is no hope for it." -- Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

May 5 – From Choice to Justice: Our Spiritual Work 40 Years After Roe

Labels are polarizing & do not help us build or strengthen our movement for reproductive health, rights & justice. We will explore the Unitarian Universalist’s current Congregational Study Action Issue (CSAI) & how we can increase our conversational capacity in this ongoing work that is pastoral, prophetic, & progressive.

Rev. Kelli Clement is the Executive Director of the MN Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. A Unitarian Universalist community minister in affiliation with First Universalist Church, she is a graduate of United Theological Seminary where she was the coordinator of Seminarians for Choice, and is a part of the national speakers bureau of the Reproductive Health Technologies Project. When her family was living in the Netherlands last year, Kelli was privileged to speak at UU congregations in Amsterdam, Basel, Brussels, Paris, & rural Germany. Kelli lives with husband Mike (whom she met at a pro-choice rally!), daughter Fia, & poodle Memphis near Lake Nokomis in S. Mpls.

May 12 – Ralph Reeder Community Support Center

Laurie Lindblad is the community social worker with the Ralph Reeder Community Support Center, where her role is to build capacity, connection and collaboration in order to support at-risk and vulnerable individuals and families within our community. Previously, she was Director of Family & School Success at The Family Partnership in Minneapolis. She has a Master’s Degree in Social Work from Denmark, where she held a number of social work positions. Laurie has over 20 years of social service experience, including directing infant, preschool and school-age childcare programs, working with children with mental health needs and their families, providing refugee counseling services, and developing and directing a number of family and community support programs.

June 2 – Flower Communion followed by the Annual Meeting

Bring a flower from your garden for our traditional Flower Communion program. To keep that day moving we will move acknowledgments and thanks you’s over lunch (Taco bar and beverages provided by the board; pot luck items provided by everyone else) followed by the Annual Meeting.

June 23 – The Glad Hatter and Her Hats

The Glad Hatter – Pati Kachel, a local story teller, will share with us her collection of vintage hats. As she puts them on, she magically becomes the colorful characters who once wore them. You’re invited to wear a hat and share a story too! Pati inspires listeners through stories and programs about life. She entertains audiences in churches, retreat centers, schools, libraries, hospitals, coffee shops, prisons, and bookstores. She has traveled from Pittsburgh to Seattle presenting her story programs and songs.

July 21 - Sea Life from the Mall of America

A representative from Sea Life will talk about animal adaptations and will have a fish tank that will allow children to touch sea life.

August 11 – The Minnesota History Center Presents Then Now Wow

From past to present, many “Wow!” moments have shaped this great state. A representative from the History Center will explain the largest exhibit ever created by the Minnesota Historical Society which explores Minnesota’s history in the prairies, forests and cities, interacting with the people and animals who have made their homes here. Everything is built at a child level but it is a program suitable for all ages.

September 8 - Water Communion

Our annual "welcome back" celebration: connection and community, revitalized through song, readings, and sharing. We’ll also highlight the centrality of "covenant" in Unitarian Universalism. For the Water Communion, please bring a small amount of water from a favorite source. What special meaning does it hold for you?

September 15 – History of Religion in America – Jon Butler

The History of Religion in America with Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of American Studies, History, and Religious Studies Yale University, Adjunct Research Professor of History University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Vice President Organization of American Historians. Religion in the United States is characterized by a diversity of religious beliefs and practices. Various religious faiths have flourished, as well as perished, in the United States. Religions that span the country’s multicultural immigrant heritage, as well as those founded within the country, have led the United States to become one of the most religiously diverse countries in the world.

September 22 - Protection of Alaska’s Wilderness by Louis Asher

Alaska may seem far from Minnesota but we are all part of the same ecosystem that makes up our planet. For example, migratory birds travel from Alaska to the rest of the U.S. and beyond. Climate change, which affects us all, is dramatically more evident in the Arctic, where regions have warmed up twice as fast as the rest of the planet.

Oil and timber extraction proposals would create great stresses in our pristine Alaskan wilderness areas. They bring tremendous perils with small short term economic gains and long term environmental consequences, as well as significant long term economic costs. We will explore proposed activities in the Arctic Ocean, the Arctic wildlife refuge, the Alaskan national petroleum reserve and the Tongass rainforest.

September 29 – Our Spiritual Relationship With The Land That Feeds Us – Atina Diffley

Atina Diffley was recommended by Rob King. Her book Turn Here Sweet Corn was a Pilgrim House book club selection and a 25th anniversary Minnesota Book Award Winner. Eating is a sacred act. Our daily food decisions affect the wellness of the land, and the life that lives upon it. Atina is an organic farmer and author who will provides an empowering conversation about our spiritual food relationships—with the earth, plants and animals, families and communities.

October 6 – Alexandra House with Krysta Sather

Alexandra House provides domestic violence and sexual violence services. Their free services include 24-hour emergency shelter, support services and advocacy to victims of domestic and sexual violence. Our fellowship has had a number of associations with Alexandra House. Often our members and children volunteer there. The Social Action and the Religious Education Committee requested that we have someone come and explain their services to us.

October 13 - Why Bees are Disappearing

Honey bees are the world’s most important pollinator of crops, they are essential to the productivity of agro- and natural ecosystems. Currently, honey bees are in serious decline in the U.S. due to the combined effects of diseases, parasites, pesticides and nutritional deficiencies. Since the term Colony Collapse Disorder was coined in 2006, national surveys reveal that 30-35% of all honey bee colonies die every winter across the U.S. Beekeepers make up losses by splitting surviving colonies or by purchasing new colonies from national bee breeders and distributors. However, this loss is not sustainable and it is critical to research ways to improve bees' natural defenses.

Renata Borba is a graduate student at Dr. Spivak’s lab at the University of Minnesota pursuing a PhD degree. She is originally from Brazil and has been in the U.S for 6 years. She is studying the effects of propolis to colony health and immunity as well as the behavior mechanisms of resin collection.

October 20 - Human Rights Don’t Defend Themselves: The Advocates for Human Rights

Since 1983, The Advocates for Human Rights has been working to promote and protect human rights and the rule of law in the U.S. and around the world. Learn about the work of The Advocates in the areas of immigration, human rights education, women’s human rights, human rights monitoring, and how you and your community can be part of the human rights movement.

The speaker will be Aviva Breen, Board Member.

October 27 - Men In Black

Men in Black are a quintet of male vocalists harmonizing a capella to a wide range of popular music, including Doo-Wop, early rock, folk and spirituals. Their musical interests reflect their lives over the past decades, and they’ve been delighted to find that younger audiences also resonate to their music. Come join us for delightful morning concert! Bob Meyenburg, Bass/Baritone; Robin Partch, Bass; Fred Bailey, Tenor; Roger Alm, Tenor/Baritone; Dick Rogers, Baritone.

November 3 – Prohibition with Dan Spock

Prohibition is the newest exhibit at the Minnesota Historical Society. Prohibition was the period in American history from 1920 to 1933 when the 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibited the manufacture, sale, transport, import, or export of alcoholic beverages. It put legal brewers out of business and opened the nation’s door to unintended consequences: bootlegging, gambling, prostitution, rackets, gangsters, and organized crime. The 18th Amendment was repealed with the passage of the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution on December 5, 1933.

November 11 - The Coalition for Impartial Justice

This is a broad-based, non-partisan organization advocating for a constitutional ballot question that allows voters the opportunity to decide how they would like to select and retain judges in Minnesota. The reforms specifically call for public performance evaluations of judges, merit selection, as well as retention elections. The coalition includes over 30 plus member organizations that represent business, labor, religious, and other non-profit organizations. - See more at: http://www.impartialcourts.org/about/index.html#sthash.Xc2lGgS6.dpuf.

November 17 – Girls inc.

Girls Inc. inspires all girls to be strong, smart, and bold through life-changing programs and experiences that help girls navigate gender, economic, and social barriers. Research-based curricula, delivered by trained, mentoring professionals in a positive all-girl environment equip girls to achieve academically; lead healthy and physically active lives; manage money; navigate media messages; and discover an interest in science, technology, engineering, and math. The network of local Girls Inc. nonprofit organizations serves 136,000 girls ages 6 - 18 annually across the United States and Canada.

November 24 - Our Traditional Pilgrim House Thanksgiving Celebration

Our PH Thanksgiving program is a not-to-be-missed time of celebration and community, bringing together Pilgrim House members and friends with special music, a performance by the Pilgrim House Chorale, seasonal readings and poetry ... and more. If you or younger members of your family have a musical selection you’d like to share, please contact Bill Rohde by Sunday 11/17. Similarly, if you have a reading you’d like to share, please contact Mel Aanerud.

Join us after the program for a Thanksgiving meal. Susan Setter is the food coordinator. As in past years, she will supply the ham and set up the social room for the event. Members/friends are asked to contribute other food items for the event. A sign-up sheet for items will be passed at PH during the programs in early November.

See you there!

December 1 - Being Politically Active within a Faith Community

Mark Ritchie is not only the Secretary of State for the State of Minnesota but also a Unitarian Universalist.

December 8 - A Feng Shui Journey

Among our six Unitarian Universalist Sources are the teachings of Earth-centered traditions, which celebrate the sacred circle of life and instruct us to live in harmony with the rhythms of nature. Feng Shui has developed out of the Earth-centered traditions of Asia. International Feng Shui expert Carole J. Hyder will walk us you through the evolution of Feng Shui from China to its present form today. Carole will explain how it began and how it has become a sought-after approach to creating balance, harmony, and purpose in life, especially in the past 10 years. Carole has facilitated hundreds of private residential and commercial consultations, and she is the founder of Wind and Water School of Feng Shui, a nine-month certification program licensed by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education. Her program at PH will highlight her experiences with students and clients, and describe how Feng Shui has been powerfully implemented in a local hospital.

December 15 - Blessings of the Dark

It’s a spiritual test for some of us to embrace the dark of winter; for others this time is precious & potent. All are welcome to this service that will explore the power & blessing of the dark through story & song.

Rev. Kelli Clement is a UU Community Minister in affiliation with First Universalist Church, and serves as the Executive Director of the MN Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice.

December 22 - Pilgrim House Holiday Celebration!

Please join us for our always-special intergenerational PH holiday program, complete with group caroling, favorite holiday readings, seasonal music, a performance by the PH Chorale, a special guest (possibly from the far north), favorite foods, and more. Contact Bill Rohde for participation in the chorale and for any music selections that will be presented by you or your children and contact Mel Aanerud for readings that might be included (please let them know by December 15). And don’t forget to bring that favorite holiday food for our traditional potluck finger foods feast after the program. Remember that parking becomes crowded for this program and we can park across the street at either the Armory or the Arden Hills City Hall lot. See you there!

December 29 - The Annual Tolling of the Bells Program

Please let Mel Aanerud or David Conradi Jones know of anyone or anything that you would like to have remembered in this annual program of remembrance.

2014

January 5 - Lessons Learned

Former Rep. Mindy Greiling served 20 years in the Minnesota House of Representatives, focusing on education and mental illness. She retired one year ago this month. Now that she has had a year to reflect, we invited her to share with us some of the lessons she learned during that time, based on what she describes as a school-of-hard-knocks education.

January 12 - Unspeakable Loss: The Heartache of Loving Someone Who Is Incapable of Loving You

Our speaker will be John Driggs.

Either by fate or by choice, many of us have loved ones who simply don’t "get it." About one in six people lack the ability to empathize with others and truly love others in a mature way. When a beloved family member has this problem we ourselves may experience unspeakable loss. Our loved one is with us, but not really with us in an emotional sense. Most of us cannot describe this loss in words, much less know how to handle it. We may be unlikely to speak about it with friends, who with good motives, may blame us or minimize our losses. We may be so ashamed of how our loved one acts that we blame ourselves or get caught up in rescuing our clueless relative from himself or herself. Extended family members may also get caught up in this loss and strain their relationships with us over how to handle a wayward relative, causing further loss. Our efforts to corral a family member into "getting it" may cause us incredible shame, so much so that we may never share our personal angst with others who appear to have escaped our dilemma. This presentation suggests ways to positively cope with these powerful losses whether or not our beloved ever does "get it'.

January 19 - Seasons of Desire

Evelyn Klein, author, educator, and artist, holds a B.S. in Secondary Education from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. She taught in the public schools, at Century College and the Loft. A prize-winning poet, her work has been variously published, including with the Family Housing Fund "Home Sweet Home Again" exhibit of poetry and art and the Minnesota Jung Association website journal, Elements. Her three books include a poetry memoir, From Here Across the Bridge, illustrated by her father, Wolfgang Klein, winning a cover award, and her next two books of prose, poetry and her own art, Once upon a Neighborhood and Seasons of Desire, both placed in the Minnesota Historical Society permanent library collection. Evelyn Klein will talk about her book Seasons of Desire, where she reveals how every season can be a new beginning as we move through stages of living, bringing us change, hope, renewal, and ongoing growth. It sheds light on both the outer and inner meanings of life.

January 26 - A Pilgrimage to Transylvania

Laura Smidzik is a minister intern who went to Transylvania on a UU pilgrimage the summer of 2013 and will speak about her journey.

February 2 - Sulfide Mining in MN: What’s at Stake

Presented by Aaron Klemz, Communications Director of Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness

What is our collective vision for northern Minnesota? What do we know about sulfide mining, and how would it impact precious regions of our state? Come hear from Aaron Klemz, Communications Director of Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness, an organization instrumental in the establishment of the Boundary Waters Wilderness Area. Their mission: to protect, preserve and restore the wilderness character of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and the Quetico-Superior Ecosystem.

February 9 - New Spring Books

Our speaker will be David Enyeart, Event Coordinator for Common Good Books. A good book is a surefire cure for the winter blahs. The folks at Common Good Books have plenty of suggestions to add to your reading list. Whether you are looking for a new cookbook, a fresh novel, or some great history, you’ll find out about all kinds of great books to help you curl up and enjoy yourself.

Common Good Books is the largest independent bookstore in St Paul. Since we first opened in 2006, the store has expanded to hold more than 30,000 books on topics ranging from fiction to philosophy and poetry to photography. Common Good Books plays host to authors for great readings almost every week. There’s even a book club full of lively discussion and fantastic conversation. And if you’re very very lucky, you might catch a glimpse of the store’s proprietor, Garrison Keillor. We hope you’ll visit us soon at the corner of Grand and Snelling in St Paul, or check us out online at http://www.commongoodbooks.com.

February 16 - My Journey Connecting with Guardian Angels and Spiritual Guides

The ways we UUers find inspiration and wisdom are many and varied. Come hear membe Louis Asher tell of his unfolding personal journey of acknowledgment and connection with his guardian angels and spiritual guides. When he listens intently, they are his still, small voice within.

February 23 - Mississippi Trip Continued

Award winning photographer, author and story teller Doug Ohman paddled his kayak with camera in hand down the mighty Mississippi from its start at Lake Itasca to the Iowa border. He returns to PH to continue his trip with stories and pictures.

March 2 - Music by the Bushnells and the Annual PH Auction

Ann and Bill Bushnell return by popular demand to entertain us with their homespun bluegrass music. They have made music together to the delight of others for over 60 years.

The Bushnells will be followed with Soup Sunday Lunch and the Annual Pilgrim House Auction.

March 9 – PFLAG - Coming Out

Tom and Gretchen Murr will share their family story that started with their son coming out as gay when he was 15. Beth Johnson will share her story of her daughter coming out to her as lesbian. In both cases the families found their way to PFLAG (Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) . The monthly PFLAG meetings provide education and support to families, friends and LGBT persons. It provides a safe environment for people to share their struggles and their experiences while learning from each other.

March 16, 2013 - “The Peculiar Power of Silence” -- Rev. Kristin Maier

Silence has the power to allow a person to regain their center and cultivate peace within. Silence, used as a weapon, can shut down or isolate another person. How can we tap into silence as a power for good and leave aside its power to oppress? Rev. Kristin Maier serves as minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Northfield. She is an accomplished storyteller and the author of A Good Telling: Bringing Worship to Life with Story.

March 23 - Recycling and Composting - Kira Berglund and Paul Gardner

Recycling and composting have been in the news lately. Hennepin County has directed Minneapolis to start up a curbside food waste collection program. Legislators have been discussing ways to increase collection of recyclables, which are in high demand. PH members Paul Gardner, Executive Director of Recycling Reinvented, and Kira Berglund, Anoka County Recycling Program Assistant and Community POWER Grant Program Manager, will share where there are great opportunities to keep waste out of landfills and incinerators, support green jobs, reduce carbon emissions, and turn organic waste into valuable soil resources.

March 30 - Folktales: Who Lived Happily Ever After?

Nothing seems to be more familiar than the plot of the traditional fairy tale. But at closer inspection we find strange contradictions. Why is the hero so feckless that he can do nothing without the assistance of a magic helper? Why does the heroine so often try to get rid of her prospective husband? Once they marry, will they live happily ever after? These are the questions Professor Liberman will explore in his talk. Anatoly Liberman, a professor in the Department of German, Scandinavian and Dutch at the University of Minnesota, was born and educated in Russia (St. Petersburg) and received all his academic degrees there. His forthcoming book has the title In Prayer and Laughter: Essays on Scandinavian Mythology and Medieval Culture.

April 6 - The Story of Pilgrim House Continued

In November of 2010, on the 40th anniversary of Pilgrim House, we presented a program which explained the early years up to 1984 when the congregation affiliated with the UUA. This time we will take you from there through the construction of the addition and the strengthening of our fellowship to where it is today.

April 13 - Songs and Dances of the Civil War Era

Join us for a lively tour of songs, memories, and dances commemorating the 150th anniversary of our deadly civil war and the death of our first major musical composer, Stephen Foster.

April 20 - A Program by Reverend Kelli Clement -- and Our Spring Celebration

There will be springtime music and readings for all to enjoy. Reverend Clement will speak on "The Ill-Fitting Grief of Ambiguous Loss". We know that loss is a consequence of love, and we may even imagine what grief may come in our lives. But what of grief & loss that lie beyond our imagining? On this Easter Sunday, what meaning can we find in and through experiences of ambiguous loss? During the speaker’s part of the program, there will be special activities for children.

Bring finger food for a Spring Brunch after the program (appetizers, veggies, fruit, breads and desserts).

April 27 - Our UU Covenant: Its Gifts and Challenges

Socrates advised, "The unexamined life is not worth living." And what could be more central to our community life as Unitarian Universalists than the concept of “covenant”? "Covenant" is a verb, as well as a noun; "covenant" is more than a singular concept, it is plural. We are a people of covenants, of promises and commitments.

In this program, we will explore some of the fundamentals of the idea of “covenant,” taking a close look at who we are as UUers, and how we want to grow. What are the challenges and gifts that our covenants hold for us? In what ways do our covenants call us to expand ourselves? Part lecture, part interactive discussion, this program raises questions that encourage reflection and dialogue.

PH member Lisa Wersal, a musician and writer, formerly taught in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Her presentation draws from her Religious Studies background, as well as her engaged participation with three different UU congregations over the past ten years.

Also, enjoy the silky sounds of special musical guests Men in Black, an a cappella men’s quintet, who will provide music during the program!

May 4 - Green Play Yard Program, MN Landscape Arboretum

Presented by Sandy Tanck, Manager of Interpretation & Public Programs at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. Sandy joined the Arboretum in 1979. She has a B.S. in Horticulture from the University of Wisconsin, and an M.S. in Horticultural Science, minor in Science Education from the University of Minnesota. She has 30 years experience creating educational programs and activities that engage people with plants and nature. She has spent a number of years working with schools, including writing curriculum, fieldtrips, delivering teacher courses and workshops and leading grant-funded partnerships between the Arboretum and suburban, urban and out-state schools in northern Minnesota reservation communities. She also led the design of the children’s education facility and its surrounding landscape features at the Arboretum, and developed the Sunshine for Dinner interactive exhibits and Under the Oak nature play area housed there. Currently she oversees the Arboretum’s interpretation including family and early childhood programs, guided tours, signage and special exhibitions.

May 11 – Love: What is Love?

Are there different kinds of love? When is it permissible to love unconditionally? Can you love someone too much? Dr. Charles Taliaferro, Professor of Philosophy, spoke at PH last year. He is the author or co-author, editor or co-editor of twenty books, most recently The Image in Mind; Theism, Naturalism and the Imagination (Continuum), co-authored with Jil Evans. With Stewart Goetz he is the co-author of A Brief History of the Soul (Blackwell) He has given lectures at Oxford, Cambridge, University of St. Andrews (Scotland), Yale, NYU, University of Chicago, the Gregorian (Rome), University of Beijing (China), and elsewhere.

May 18 – Doug Wood and the Wild Spirit Band

Doug Wood, author of children and adult books, musician and northwood’s guide, and The Wild Spirit Band will be back in concert at Pilgrim House. The Pilgrim House portion of the program will be very short and the Wild Spirit Band will provide us with a longer concert which might include a north woods story or two from Doug. A light lunch will follow the program.

May 25 – Memorial Day Weekend – no program

June 1 – Flower Communion, Lunch, and Annual Membership Meeting.

Bring flowers to add to the bouquet and attend the lunch and annual meeting after the program. Elect the chair elect and other officers, approve the 2014-15 budget, and select delegates to the General Assembly in Providence, Rhode Island. All are encouraged to attend.

June 29 – Introduction to Bird Watching, a talk given by Clay Christensen

Do I have to wear tweed and a hat to go bird watching? How about gummy tennis shoes? In this talk, we’ll dispel the myths and uncover some of the joys of birdwatching. We’ll cover bird identification tips, binocular choices, field guide selection, tips for conduct in the field and ways to keep track of what you find. Author and columnist Clay Christensen has been leading bird watching field trips for St. Paul Audubon and other organizations for over 20 years. He’s often requested to speak to bird clubs, corporate groups, conferences and other audiences. His new book is entitled The Birdman of Lauderdale, which one reviewer calls “A wise and witty ramble through the world of birding.”

July 20 – Mooncoin Ceili Dancers

The Mooncoin Ceili Dancers have been performing traditional and choreographed Irish ceili and set dances (social dances of Ireland) since forming in 1976. The group will be sharing some of these dances through performance and teaching. Bring your dancing shoes and learn some jigs and reels, or just come to watch. More information about the Mooncoin Ceili Dancers can be found on their website at http://www.mooncoinceili.com.

August 10 – University of Minnesota Raptor Center

A raptor education specials will bring a special one-hour program to Pilgrim House. Along with a variety of hands-on props and and raptors including an Eagle

September 7 - Water Communion

Our annual "welcome back" celebration: connection and community, revitalized through song, readings, and sharing. For the Water Communion, please bring a small amount of water from a favorite source. What meaning does this water hold for you?

September 14 – How Do Photographs Form Us

Our presenter, Wing Young Huie, fosters dialogue by showing culturally complex photographs from his many projects that are open to interpretation, inviting contrasting points of view from audience participants by asking, “What do you see?” He then facilitates a dialogue before revealing stories behind the photographs, which complicates perceptions further. This presentation explores how our deeply embedded perceptions are often driven by the countless pop culture images we’ve consumed, rather than by direct experience.

September 21 – Vestments

Author John Reimringer Minnesota Author Winner of the 2011 Minnesota Book Award John was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and raised in Topeka, Kansas, has his BS in journalism from the University of Kansas and an MFA in creative writing from the University of Arkansas. Was a newspaper editor in Kansas at the Parsons Sun and Hutchinson News; He teaches English at Normandale Community College and lives in Saint Paul’s Hamline-Midway neighborhood with his wife, the poet Katrina Vandenberg. When he moved to Saint Paul in 2001, Reimringer became the fifth generation of his father’s family to live here: his great-great grandfather became a U.S. citizen in Saint Paul in 1856, two years after the city was founded, and ran a saloon and grocery store downtown; his great-grandfather was married in Assumption Church in 1880 and died in a tumble from a sleigh at the second-ever Saint Paul Winter Carnival in 1887.

September 28 – Last Keeper at the Split Rock Light House

Mike Roberts was the Last Keeper at the Split Rock Light House. He was stationed there with his family for 27 months on active duty in the US Coast Guard. He lived in Ely prior to going into the Service and joined the USCG in April of 1966. He was stationed at Split Rock Light House for 27 months, and it was his family’s home until it was decommissioned and permanently closed on January 1, 1969. It was closed because it was obsolete due to the use of radio beacons and other electronic devices. It was costly to have the station manned by two men with their families. In 2007, He retired from Minnesota State College and University System after 26 years of teaching. In his retirement, he wrote the book, "The Last Keeper at Split Rock" for his grandchildren so they might know some of the things that happened in his and his wife Mary lives before they were born. The Split Rock lighthouse is one of the most photographed and visited aid to navigation sites in the USA.

October 5 – Music from Transylvania – Colleen Bertsch

Not all Transylvanian string band music is the same! By sharing video examples from their fieldwork collection and demonstrating musical techniques, the American band Szászka offers a glimpse at the world of Transylvanian string band music through a multi-media informational performance.

Szászka was formed in 1996 to perform traditional Hungarian village dance music for events and workshops in the United States. Szászka performs regularly at táncház events in Minneapolis and Chicago, and at festivals and concerts in the Midwest. The group has studied with Hungarian and Transylvanian musicians in Hungary, Romania and the United States. Szászka is Colleen Bertsch (violin), Sara Bruins (bass) and Doug Code (kontra).

October 12 - The Top Conservation Threats We Face, and What One Can Do to Make a Difference

The Sierra Club’s members and supporters are 2.1 million of your friends and neighbors. Inspired by nature, we work together to protect our communities and the planet. The Club is America’s oldest, largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization. Minnesota’s North Star Chapter is the leading grassroots voice to preserve our state’s air, lands, water and climate. State Director Margaret Levin will discuss the top conservation threats we face, and what one can do to make a difference.

October 19 - Sand, Cattle & Land Stewardship: How Can we Keep the Land and People Together?

George Boody, Executive Director, Land Stewardship Project. George will talk about work of Land Stewardship Project (LSP) and discuss how frac sand mining threatens farmland, trout streams and rural communities in southeastern MN and western Wisconsin. LSP successfully organizes members and citizens to address this locally and through the Minnesota state government, while also advancing pasture-based cattle as an effective approach to stewardship that provides long-term economic activity and healthful food for people to eat. He will discuss options to take action.

October 26 - Doug Ohman: Photo Tour of the Mississippi, Part III

Doug Ohman Photographer extraordinaire did a photo tour of the Mississippi and he returns to Pilgrim House for the third time to complete his photographic trip down the Mississippi. This time the tour is from Saint Paul to the Minnesota Iowa border. After the program, you may want to visit the annual Pilgrim House Halloween Haunted Basement created by the Pilgrim House youth.

November 2 – The Legacy of 1914 and the Crises of Today

Tom Hanson has been at Pilgrim House, both for Sunday programs and for the Great Decisions programs. Since it is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I, he is back to tell us about The Legacy of 1914 and the Crises of Today. Using 1914 as a framework, he will comment on all of those issues as well as on the lessons to be drawn from the way countries went "sleepwalking" into the slaughterhouse that was World War I.

November 9 – Minnesota Clean Energy Solutions

Speaker: J. Drake Hamilton is the Science Policy Director at the nonprofit organization Fresh Energy Minnesota is on a clean energy path that is creating thousands of jobs and protecting human health and natural resources while cutting carbon pollution that causes global warming. But our work is not done. Join J. Drake Hamilton, science policy director at Fresh Energy, to learn more about historic opportunities Minnesota has to make big strides in clean energy in 2015.

November 16 – Reproductive Health in Minnesota and across the Country

Speaker Linnea House, outgoing Executive Director of NARAL Pro-Choice Minnesota. Description: Linnea will address the current state of affairs on the reproductive health landscape, especially following the recent election, and what we can expect in the coming years as we continue to fight for reproductive rights in Minnesota and across the country.

November 23 – Our Traditional Pilgrim House Thanksgiving Celebration

Our PH Thanksgiving program is a not-to-be-missed time of celebration and community, bringing together Pilgrim House members and friends with special music, a performance by the Pilgrim House Chorale, seasonal readings and poetry ... and more. If you or younger members of your family have a musical selection you’d like to share, please contact Bill Rohde by Sunday 11/16. Similarly, if you have a reading you’d like to share, please contact Mel Aanerud. And don’t forget to bring a dish to pass for our traditional pot luck feast immediately after the program. See you there!

November 30 – Mark Twain

Today marks the 180th birthday of Samuel Clemens otherwise known as Mark Twain. We will hear his history in his own words from his writings especially his autobiography which was published 100 years after his death. There will also be words put into the mouth of his character Huckleberry Finn and some recollections from his daughter Suzy.

December 7 – Making Water Clean, Keeping Water Available

Minnesota is one of a handful of states that does a pretty good job of looking out for its water resources. The system allows for significant local control and funding levels are relatively high. Successes abound in some sectors and regions, while progress in others seems unable to keep pace with land alterations that degrade water. Steve has worked water issues from the private, public, and non-profit sectors and will explain why decades of data have turned into knowledge that is spurring on-the-ground actions to make things better.

The speaker is Steve Woods, Executive Director of Fresh Water Society.

December 14 – Minnesota SAFE Elders

A once-small group that Anoka County Attorney Tony Palumbo started to confront elder abuse has unleashed an arsenal of resources to help educate Minnesotans about the problem. Minnesota SAFE Elders has created a tool kit that includes video and training materials that it will provide free to interested groups. The group also developed an app for first responders to guide them through such cases and a community resource list they can immediately offer to victims. The SAFE stands for Stop Abuse and Financial Exploitation.

December 21 – Our Annual Holiday Celebration

Please join us for our always-special intergenerational PH holiday program, complete with group caroling, favorite holiday readings, seasonal music, a performance by the PH Chorale, a special guest (possibly from the far north), favorite foods, and more. Contact Bill Rohde for participation in the chorale and for any music selections that will be presented by you or your children and contact Mel Aanerud for readings that might be included. And don’t forget to bring that favorite holiday food for our traditional potluck finger foods feast after the program. Remember that parking becomes crowded for this program and we can park across the street at either the Armory or the Arden Hills City Hall lot. See you there!

December 28 – Our Annual Day Of Remembrance

Mel Aanerud and David Conradi-Jones will begin the program, but We want a major portion of the program to be an opportunity for everyone who would like to have the bell rung - to rejoice some event or action - to mourn some loss - to pray for a better tomorrow - to invoke a blessing on anyone - to dispel a demon that troubles you - to look ahead at things to be done - to project the best for yourself, this community, the world - to express your joys and concerns - to agree or disagree with any of our choices for recognition or our choices for stories of importance

2015

January 4 – The City in Flames: A Child’s Recollection of World War II in Wurzburg, Germany

From the moment Germany ignites World War II, life changes radically for young Elisabeth, her family and other residents of Würzburg. When a fire-bombing near the war’s end destroys most of the city, earlier hardships turn into a desperate struggle for survival as the family takes shelter in a cabin outside of town. Through it all, Elisabeth finds moments of humor and compassion. From a bugled midnight attempt to milk a neighbor’s goat, a Russian POW risking his life to save her family to communion dresses sewn from the only material on hand—a dead soldier’s parachute—to the baker who rewards Elisabeth’s mother’s confession about stealing a loaf of his bread by giving her another. Together, the stories captured in this memoir provide a gripping picture of everyday life in a world gone up in flames.

The presenter, Elisabeth von Berrinberg, was born in Wurzburg, Germany, and migrated to the United States in 1955 after marrying an American soldier. In addition to raising her daughter, Lorraine, she had a long career as a darkroom technician both in Germany and the United States. She is also the author of The Cozy Connection, a cozy mystery series featuring The Adventures of Countess von Schleppmeister, The Jewel Heist, The Cruise, The Missing Madonna, A Culinary Experience, Mystery at the Pearly Gates, and The Doppelgänger. She is presently working on a series of children’s books.

January 11 – Creation Care is About the Seventh Generation

John Muir said, “Everybody needs beauty as well as bread…where nature may heal and give strength… What does that mean in a time where the earth itself is stressed and under siege? Dr. Luther Dale will talk about how his journey of love for the beauty of creation has lead to work on behalf of the earth. He will speak of the need for a radical sense of urgency on behalf of those yet unborn.

January 18 – Immigration Policy and how it is viewed and effects people in Minnesota

Presented by Alberto Monserrate who is Co-Founder and President of the Minnesota Latino Communications Network. Alberto will talk about current immigration reform policy, recent policy history and an update on where things are at today. He will discuss the impact of the recent Presidential executive order that extended deferred action on immigration policy, and what can be done to pressure congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform. He will also discuss local immigration policy and the upcoming fight to pass drivers licences regardless of immigration status in the Minnesota house this coming session.

January 25 – Joint Religious Legislative Coalition

Presented by Brian A. Rusche – executive director, Joint Religious Legislative Coalition interfaith advocacy for social justice speaking on JRLC and our 2015 Legislative Agenda.

February 1 – Minnesota and the War of 1812

This program is presented by Pilgrim House member Paul Gardner who is the local president of the Society of the War of 1812. Although no battles were fought in Minnesota, the treaties that ended the war finalized and demilitarized the border with Canada, resulting in two centuries of peace and prosperity with our neighbor. It is the 200th anniversary of the war. For more information go to http://www.minnesota1812.org.

February 8 - Transportation in the Twin Cities

Forecast of what is planned, what is hoped for and how individuals can help to make it happen. Presented by the Metropolitan Council.

February 15 - Inner Technology

Presented by Cindi Claypatch.

Inner Technology - Understanding the inside out nature of experience via the gifts of Divine Mind, Consciousness and Thought helps us to connect to and identify with our spiritual essence. When connected to our formless essence, our core health takes shape as wisdom, intuition, good judgement, love, common sense resilience..... we live life with less effort and become more grounded. From this place we can radiate our energy, feel inspired and be grounded change agents in our worlds.

February 22 - Teddy Roosevelt

Adam Lindquist is Teddy Roosevelt and presents a program in Roosevelt’s own words. Teddy Roosevelt was the nation’s youngest president and one of the faces on Mount Rushmore. Environmentalist, but also an advocate for empire.

March 1 – Invisible Children

Presented by Mike Tikkanen and Tiffini Flynn Forslund. Mike has been a volunteer county guardian ad-Litem since 1996. He is also a CASAMN board member & founder of KARA, Kids At Risk Action with a mission to speak for the rights and awareness of abused and neglected children. KARA’s current project is a television documentary/expose with TPT. By generating conversation and exposing facts that many are afraid or unable to speak about, Mike brings attention to the critical issues facing abused & neglected children. Mike identifies the problems children, schools, and neighborhoods face daily because of poor public policy and the dysfunction created by lack of awareness within our community. The KARA website is http://www.invisiblechildren.org.

Following the program is Soup Sunday and the Annual PH Auction.

March 8 - World War I, 100th Anniversary

Kim Munholland, Professor Emeritus University of Minnesota. The 100th anniversary of the war leads us to ask what led to the war and if we have any parallels today.

March 15 – Advocating for Minnesota’s Housing Continuum

Some 14,000 Minnesotans are homeless on any given night and 13,000 school children lack stable housing. The expansion of housing options and economic opportunity is the most humane and cost-effective approach to addressing homelessness. This will promote better health, education, and economic outcomes. This presentation will focus on what makes a housing continuum and why it’s important to invest in it.

The speaker, Dan Kitzberger, Policy Director, of Minnesota Coalition for the Homeless, has experience as a researcher, organizer, and advocate in a variety of nonprofit organizations including the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, Association for Nonsmokers, and Neighborhood Housing Services.

March 22 – Jazz and the Spirit

In a “mostly music” service, saxophonist/writer Richard Terrill and pianist Larry McDonough will talk about the spiritual dimension of music and of jazz improvisation. They will perform a selection of familiar tunes and original compositions, including some not usually heard in the jazz idiom, such as “Simple Gifts,” “God Bless America,” and “We Shall Overcome.”

March 29 – Meditation and Mindfulness

Meditation and Mindfulness: These terms and these practices are showing up all around us today. What are they really about and what is their relevance for the spiritual life of a modern Unitarian Universalist?

We’ll consider the roots of these practices in the Zen Buddhist tradition. We’ll take a careful look at that phenomenon so elusive in our culture: silence. What of the deeper silence beyond the absence of noise, the silence of a still mind? We’ll consider meditation practice in the context of the Three Trainings common to many schools of Buddhism: meditation, insight into the deeply interdependent nature of reality, and morality, our responsibility for ethical behavior. And we’ll turn to outer and inner silence in some meditation practice.

Kenneth Ford is a lay teacher at Clouds in Water Zen Center in St. Paul who has recently received transmission in the lineage of his original teacher, Dainin Katagiri, the founding abbot of Soto Zen practice in Minnesota. In addition to his teaching roles, Ken currently leads a meditation group at Unity Church-Unitarian in St. Paul.

April 5 – Spring Celebration with guest minister Laura Thompson

Spring Cleaning, Bunnies and Resurrection: An exploration of the themes of spring rituals and holy days. What meaning do they bring to our lives?

Laura Thompson is a UU candidate for ministry. She is currently a chaplain resident at United Hospital and recently completed her M.Div at United Theological Seminary. Laura has previously spoken at First Unitarian Society, Unitarian Church of Underwood, Dakota UU Church, UU Church of Fargo Moorhead and UU Church of Minnetonka. She makes her home in St. Paul with her wife, Emily.

Following the program will be Soup Sunday with a potluck brunch of finger foods.

April 12 – Immigration

Immigration is a topic that the Unitarian Universalist Association has asked us to explore. We began discussion of immigration policy with Alberto Monserrate who is Co-Founder and President of the Minnesota Latino Communications Network in January. On April 12th we will have another perspective from Bill Blazar of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce, who contends that immigration is a positive when we look at the financial and business considerations.

April 19 – Exploding the Myths Around Gun Violence

Protect Minnesota has worked to End Gun Violence and has been the organization at the forefront of legislative efforts against gun violence, such as the defeat of the Stand Your Ground/Shoot First bill in Minnesota and the passage of a bill in 2014 to keep guns out of the hands of domestic abusers. Since 2010, Protect Minnesota has organized youth violence prevention programs and worked to change the narrative around gun violence.

Presented by Mary Lewis Grow.

April 26 – Music of the Civil War and Mid 19th Century

Both Bill Rohde and Mel Aanerud saw a performance of the New Pearl Buttons Band at the Minnesota Historical Society. Individually, they concluded that we should get this group to perform at Pilgrim House. New Pearl Buttons Band is a three piece group that plays Civil War and mid-19th Century American music and are the house band at the LeDuc Historic Estate in Hastings.

May 3 – Last Year’s Elections – How are they going for us?

David Schultz teaches election law at Hamline University. He is an author, a Fulbright Scholar, who has taught extensively in Europe and is a national award winner for public affairs teaching. Many of us know him from Public Television’s Almanac program. He returns to Pilgrim House to discuss the election in 2014 and a new configuration of government both at the state and national level. David will use his experience and insight to let us know what it all means for each of us individually and as a group.

May 10 – Parenting and Grace (Mothers Day)

The great theologian Paul Tillich once described grace as that thing which breaks into our lives and surprises us into wholeness. We are struck alive like a bell awakened with sound and purpose, and we ring with a new pattern. Today we explore the intersection of Parenting and Grace. What might it mean to parent and nurture our relationships with our children and parents with grace? How might we welcome grace into these joyful, challenging and sometimes difficult relationships. Could grace also make space for us to investigate stories that might otherwise get lost in the Hallmark holiday of Mother’s Day? Andrea Johnson is pursuing her Master of Divinity degree at United Theological Seminary in New Brighton, MN. She is a member of First Universalist Church in Minneapolis where she is active on the Pastoral Care Team, facilitating small groups and becoming a Racial Justice trainer. She lives in Minneapolis.

May 17 – Sex Trafficking in Minnesota – Teresa Forliti, of Breaking Free

Terry Forliti will do a Power Point presentation and a Short Video titled "Sarah’s Story." She will cover how women/girls get into prostitution and what prostitution looks like in Minnesota. She will also cover what Breaking Free does to combat sex trafficking and how they work on ending the “demand”. The entire world is looking at a model called “The Nordic Model”. For all intents and purposes, what that does is to make the selling of sex legal and the purchasing of sex illegal. It puts the onus on the “tricks/johns” and “pimps”. The Nordic countries in Europe have adapted these laws and principles for many years and they are now realizing that a second generation is being raised that already has the mindset that buying women/girls is not OK. It has been very effective. Both Canada and Ireland are in the process of implementing these laws. We would love to see it happen in America.

Terry Forliti, Systems Analyst & Volunteer Manager. In addition to being a survivor of many forms of sexual, physical and emotional abuse, Terry focused on empowerment of the marginalized while obtaining her degree in Organizational Leadership from Bethel University in 2006. Terry served on the Board of Directors of Breaking Free, which assists women in leaving the sex trade, and was eventually hired as staff.

May 31 – Flower Communion, Lunch, and Annual Meeting

Bring a flower from your garden to be joined with flowers from others showing the beauty of our diversity. Hear the origins of this service from 1923 Czechoslovakia that is held annually just before the summer recess of the church. The Religious Education students will have a presentation. Stay for a taco bar lunch and the Pilgrim House annual meeting. Please come and hear what is planned for next year, celebrate this year’s volunteers and approve the new budget. This is a lay led congregation and this is the time to become informed and participate in decisions. See the article below for the meeting agenda. Members may bring a dessert or side dish for the lunch.

June 21 – Science in our Daily Lives – A Fun Interactive Presentation by Louis Asher

One can find the effects of science in every aspect of our lives. This fun interactive presentation will show how science influences us by viewing common items in new and creative ways. This will include a soda bottle, postage stamps, reflective traffic signage material and a number of handy household products (including Post-It Brand Notes, sponges, and adhesive tapes). Louis Asher, the speaker, will share info from his 39 years as a 3M Researcher and Statistician in a humorous and educational approach well suited for all ages.

Louis Asher was a Researcher and Statistician during his 39 year 3M Co. career. He created and presented countless classes on statistical, mathematical and procedural subjects that focused on the scientific approach. He was known as a very practical, motivating and extremely entertaining/fun instructor. After retiring Louis has volunteered in organizations that deal with habitat conservation, climate change and renewable energy. (Father’s Day)

July 19 – Helping Paws – the dogs in the blue coat

A representative from Helping Paws, a service dog provider, will come to explain their program for furthering the independence of individuals with physical disabilities. She will have a service dog with her to demonstrate the amazing things that trained dogs can do.

August 9 – Twin City Chinese Dance Company

The TCCDC was established in 2002, as a non-profit performing arts and educational organization founded with the goal of promoting the understanding and appreciation of Chinese culture. They will provide a dance program for us followed by a brief workshop.

September 13 - Water Communion

Our annual "welcome back" celebration: connection and community, revitalized through song, readings, and sharing. For the Water Communion, please bring a small amount of water from a favorite source. What meaning does this water hold for you?

September 20 – Our Movement and The Movement: Unitarian Universalism’s Relationship with Movements for Social Justice

Reverend Ashley Horan, M.Div., UU minister, Executive Director of MUUSJA (Minnesota Unitarian Universalist Social Justice Alliance), Many Unitarian Universalists say they come to our congregations because of our progressive stance and participation in social justice causes. Where does that impulse come from in our tradition? What have we done well, and where have we fallen short of our ideals? And, with such small numbers, can Unitarian Universalists ever hope to have an impact on "bending the moral arc of the universe toward justice?"

September 27 – Alzheimer’s Poetry Project

Zoë Bird, poet and director of the Alzheimer’s Poetry Project Minnesota, works with communities of all ages and cognitive stripes to create collaborative poetry. She will facilitate an exploration of today’s topic through joyful, high-energy group discussion and poem creation and performance.

October 4 – Harold Stassen

Steve Werle has written a new book "Stassen Again" the life of Minnesota boy governor, war hero, one of the writers of the U.N. charter and a person who ran for president a number of times published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press.

October 11 – Iraqi Voices

Iraqi Voices is an ongoing collaborative mentorship program that gives Iraqis in Minnesota support and training to transform their stories into high-quality documentary video shorts. The films are written and directed by Iraqi-American participants and are photographed and edited by Nathan Fisher. Produced by the Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project and Northern Monday Films, this activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund.

We will show 2 or 3 short films from the Iraqi Voices project. Nathan Fisher and one of the Iraqi-American participants will be present to answer questions.

October 18 – Excerpts and Essays from Local Writer John Landretti

John will do a reading of his own work. He is a published writer; most of his work has appeared in a magazine called Orion. Genre is the literary essay, though he do writes poetry as well. His writing explores our relationship with "place" and what we mean by "spirituality."

October 25 – History of Gay and Lesbian Ministry

Obie Holmen – A civil trial attorney, Holmen has written a new book on the history of Gay and Lesbian ministry in American Protestantism and how various denominations have dealt with the issue of ordaining gay clergy.

November 1 – Haints, Saints, and Souls: A Ritual to Mark the Turning of the Year

What wisdom and energy can we take in to the darker months of the year? How can our ancestors show us the way? Join Rev. Kelli Clement in an exploration of how ancient themes illuminate contemporary life.

Rev. Kelli Clement is the Social Justice Minister at First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis and the Training and Curriculum Consultant for the national office of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. She lives in South Minneapolis with her husband, daughter, and poodle Memphis.

November 8 – OutFront Minnesota

OutFront Minnesota’s mission is to create a state where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people are free to be who they are, love who they love, and live without fear of violence, harassment or discrimination. They envision a state where LGBTQ individuals have equal opportunities, protection and rights. They are working toward the day when all Minnesotans have the freedom, power and confidence to make the best choices for their own lives. The speaker is Ashley Harp.

November 15 – The Monarch Butterfly and What Anyone Can Do

Kathy Johnson is a Master Gardener and Monarch Butterfly enthusiast. She hatches them, tags them and urges proper growth in people’s yards and gardens to save them. The Monarch is endangered and we can help.

November 22 – Our Traditional Pilgrim House Thanksgiving Celebration

Our PH Thanksgiving program is a not-to-be-missed time of celebration and community, bringing together Pilgrim House members and friends with special music, a performance by the Pilgrim House Chorale, seasonal readings and poetry... and more. If you or younger members of your family have a musical selection you’d like to share, please contact Bill Rohde by Sunday 11/15. Similarly, if you have a reading you’d like to share, please contact Mel Aanerud. And don’t forget to bring a dish to pass for our traditional pot luck feast immediately after the program. See you there!

November 29 – How the "War To End All Wars" Came Out As "The Peace To End All Peace.”

Professor Munholland was here last year to explain how World War I began and how it relates to today. He returns to explain why the peace did not end all wars and how those mistakes shaped the world today.

December 6 – Minnesota Innocence Project

The Minnesota Innocence Project works to free people who are in prison for crimes they did not commit, and works towards systemic change to prevent unjust convictions.

The speaker will be Heather Ring, Executive Director.

December 13 – Harriet Beecher Stowe

Author Dr. Nancy Koester is a Minnesota author and a professor who specializes in the history of religion in America. In Harriet Beecher Stowe: A Spiritual Life, she explores this middle aged mother who wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin. That anti-slavery novel made Stowe famous overnight. She toured Europe as a celebrity and became the best-selling author of the century.  But she also suffered personal tragedy and loss: one child died of cholera, one drowning and one at Gettysburg. Through it all, she pursued her spiritual quest from stern New England Calvinism to a broader, more open form of Christianity.

December 20 – Traditional Holiday Celebration

Please join us for our always-special intergenerational PH holiday program, complete with group caroling, favorite holiday readings, seasonal music, a performance by the PH Chorale, a special guest (possibly from the far north), favorite foods, and more. And don’t forget to bring that favorite holiday food for our traditional potluck finger foods feast after the program. See you there!

December 27 – Our Annual Day of Remembrance

Mel Aanerud or David Conradi-Jones will take requests to have the bell rung – to rejoice some event or action – to mourn some loss – to pray for a better tomorrow – to invoke a blessing on anyone – to dispel a demon that troubles you – to look ahead at things to be done – to project the best for yourself, this community, the world – to express your joys and concerns – Contact Mel or David to be included.

2016

January 3 – Cemeteries of Minnesota by Doug Ohman

Doug Ohman, photographer, who has been to Pilgrim House many times with his “Photographs of … in Minnesota” returns with a proposed book of the Cemeteries of Minnesota.

January 10 – Her Honor: Rosalie Wahl

Lori Sturdevant the columnist and author bring us the story of the first woman Minnesota Supreme Court Justice and Lori’s new book about her called Her Honor.

January 17 – Wildlife Rehab Center

Julia Schmitz, who works at the Wildlife Rehab Center and a member of Pilgrim House, will tell us about the important work of this organization.

January 24 – Racial Justice: A Journey Towards Waking Up, Catching Up, and Showing Up

Andrea Johnson who has been at Pilgrim House before will present a program entitled Racial Justice: A journey towards waking up, catching up and showing up. Andrea Johnson is pursuing her Master of Divinity degree at United Theological Seminary in New Brighton, MN. She is a member of First Universalist Church in Minneapolis where she is active on the Pastoral Care Team, facilitating small groups and becoming a Racial Justice trainer.

January 31 – Corporate Personhood or Democracy

Through decisions of the judiciary, the 14th Amendment has been co-opted to give corporations the inalienable rights that the U.S. Constitution meant for human beings; albeit white, male landowners at the time it was adopted. Though more people have been granted these rights through amendments, more recently, the courts have also been finding those rights for corporations. We will explore this history and discuss the developing movement to reject the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United and other related cases, and amend our Constitution to firmly establish that money is not speech, and that human beings, not corporations, are persons entitled to constitutional rights. The speaker will be Barbara Gerten, Co-Chair of the Minnesota Move To Amend State Network.

Beginning here, programs are newest first followed by older programs.

December 27 – Our Annual Day of Remembrance

Mel Aanerud or David Conradi-Jones will take requests to have the bell rung – to rejoice some event or action – to mourn some loss – to pray for a better tomorrow – to invoke a blessing on anyone – to dispel a demon that troubles you – to look ahead at things to be done – to project the best for yourself, this community, the world – to express your joys and concerns – Contact Mel or David to be included.


December 20 – Traditional Holiday Celebration

Please join us for our always-special intergenerational PH holiday program, complete with group caroling, favorite holiday readings, seasonal music, a performance by the PH Chorale, a special guest (possibly from the far north), favorite foods, and more. And don’t forget to bring that favorite holiday food for our traditional potluck finger foods feast after the program. See you there!


December 13 – Harriet Beecher Stowe

Author Dr. Nancy Koester is a Minnesota author and a professor who specializes in the history of religion in America. In Harriet Beecher Stowe: A Spiritual Life, she explores this middle aged mother who wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin. That anti-slavery novel made Stowe famous overnight. She toured Europe as a celebrity and became the best-selling author of the century. But she also suffered personal tragedy and loss: one child died of cholera, one drowning and one at Gettysburg. Through it all, she pursued her spiritual quest from stern New England Calvinism to a broader, more open form of Christianity.


December 6 – Minnesota Innocence Project

The Minnesota Innocence Project works to free people who are in prison for crimes they did not commit, and works towards systemic change to prevent unjust convictions.

The speaker will be Heather Ring, Executive Director.


November 29 – How the "War To End All Wars" Came Out As "The Peace To End All Peace.”

Professor Munholland was here last year to explain how World War I began and how it relates to today. He returns to explain why the peace did not end all wars and how those mistakes shaped the world today.


November 22 – Our Traditional Pilgrim House Thanksgiving Celebration

Our PH Thanksgiving program is a not-to-be-missed time of celebration and community, bringing together Pilgrim House members and friends with special music, a performance by the Pilgrim House Chorale, seasonal readings and poetry... and more. If you or younger members of your family have a musical selection you’d like to share, please contact Bill Rohde by Sunday 11/15. Similarly, if you have a reading you’d like to share, please contact Mel Aanerud. And don’t forget to bring a dish to pass for our traditional pot luck feast immediately after the program. See you there!


November 15 – The Monarch Butterfly and What Anyone Can Do

Kathy Johnson is a Master Gardener and Monarch Butterfly enthusiast. She hatches them, tags them and urges proper growth in people’s yards and gardens to save them. The Monarch is endangered and we can help.


November 8 – OutFront Minnesota

OutFront Minnesota’s mission is to create a state where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people are free to be who they are, love who they love, and live without fear of violence, harassment or discrimination. They envision a state where LGBTQ individuals have equal opportunities, protection and rights. They are working toward the day when all Minnesotans have the freedom, power and confidence to make the best choices for their own lives. The speaker is Ashley Harp.


November 1 – Haints, Saints, and Souls: A Ritual to Mark the Turning of the Year

What wisdom and energy can we take in to the darker months of the year? How can our ancestors show us the way? Join Rev. Kelli Clement in an exploration of how ancient themes illuminate contemporary life.

Rev. Kelli Clement is the Social Justice Minister at First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis and the Training and Curriculum Consultant for the national office of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. She lives in South Minneapolis with her husband, daughter, and poodle Memphis.


October 25 – History of Gay and Lesbian Ministry

Obie Holmen – A civil trial attorney, Holmen has written a new book on the history of Gay and Lesbian ministry in American Protestantism and how various denominations have dealt with the issue of ordaining gay clergy.


October 18 – Excerpts and Essays from Local Writer John Landretti

John will do a reading of his own work. He is a published writer; most of his work has appeared in a magazine called Orion. Genre is the literary essay, though he do writes poetry as well. His writing explores our relationship with "place" and what we mean by "spirituality."


October 11 – Iraqi Voices

Iraqi Voices is an ongoing collaborative mentorship program that gives Iraqis in Minnesota support and training to transform their stories into high-quality documentary video shorts. The films are written and directed by Iraqi-American participants and are photographed and edited by Nathan Fisher. Produced by the Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project and Northern Monday Films, this activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund.

We will show 2 or 3 short films from the Iraqi Voices project. Nathan Fisher and one of the Iraqi-American participants will be present to answer questions.


October 4 – Harold Stassen

Steve Werle has written a new book "Stassen Again" the life of Minnesota boy governor, war hero, one of the writers of the U.N. charter and a person who ran for president a number of times published by the Minnesota Historical Society Press.


September 27 – Alzheimer’s Poetry Project

Zoë Bird, poet and director of the Alzheimer’s Poetry Project Minnesota, works with communities of all ages and cognitive stripes to create collaborative poetry. She will facilitate an exploration of today’s topic through joyful, high-energy group discussion and poem creation and performance.


September 20 – Our Movement and The Movement: Unitarian Universalism’s Relationship with Movements for Social Justice

Reverend Ashley Horan, M.Div., UU minister, Executive Director of MUUSJA (Minnesota Unitarian Universalist Social Justice Alliance), Many Unitarian Universalists say they come to our congregations because of our progressive stance and participation in social justice causes. Where does that impulse come from in our tradition? What have we done well, and where have we fallen short of our ideals? And, with such small numbers, can Unitarian Universalists ever hope to have an impact on "bending the moral arc of the universe toward justice?"


September 13 - Water Communion

Our annual "welcome back" celebration: connection and community, revitalized through song, readings, and sharing. For the Water Communion, please bring a small amount of water from a favorite source. What meaning does this water hold for you?


August 9 – Twin City Chinese Dance Company

The TCCDC was established in 2002, as a non-profit performing arts and educational organization founded with the goal of promoting the understanding and appreciation of Chinese culture. They will provide a dance program for us followed by a brief workshop.


July 19 – Helping Paws – The Dogs in the Blue Coat

A representative from Helping Paws, a service dog provider, will come to explain their program for furthering the independence of individuals with physical disabilities. She will have a service dog with her to demonstrate the amazing things that trained dogs can do.


June 21 – Science in our Daily Lives – A Fun Interactive Presentation by Louis Asher

One can find the effects of science in every aspect of our lives. This fun interactive presentation will show how science influences us by viewing common items in new and creative ways. This will include a soda bottle, postage stamps, reflective traffic signage material and a number of handy household products (including Post-It Brand Notes, sponges, and adhesive tapes). Louis Asher, the speaker, will share info from his 39 years as a 3M Researcher and Statistician in a humorous and educational approach well suited for all ages.

Louis Asher was a Researcher and Statistician during his 39 year 3M Co. career. He created and presented countless classes on statistical, mathematical and procedural subjects that focused on the scientific approach. He was known as a very practical, motivating and extremely entertaining/fun instructor. After retiring Louis has volunteered in organizations that deal with habitat conservation, climate change and renewable energy.


May 31 – Flower Communion, Lunch, and Annual Meeting

Bring a flower from your garden to be joined with flowers from others showing the beauty of our diversity. Hear the origins of this service from 1923 Czechoslovakia that is held annually just before the summer recess of the church. The Religious Education students will have a presentation. Stay for a taco bar lunch and the Pilgrim House annual meeting. Please come and hear what is planned for next year, celebrate this year’s volunteers and approve the new budget. This is a lay led congregation and this is the time to become informed and participate in decisions. See the May newsletter for the meeting agenda. Members may bring a dessert or side dish for the lunch.


May 17 – Sex Trafficking in Minnesota – Teresa Forliti, of Breaking Free

Terry Forliti will do a Power Point presentation and a Short Video titled "Sarah’s Story." She will cover how women/girls get into prostitution and what prostitution looks like in Minnesota. She will also cover what Breaking Free does to combat sex trafficking and how they work on ending the “demand”. The entire world is looking at a model called “The Nordic Model”. For all intents and purposes, what that does is to make the selling of sex legal and the purchasing of sex illegal. It puts the onus on the “tricks/johns” and “pimps”. The Nordic countries in Europe have adapted these laws and principles for many years and they are now realizing that a second generation is being raised that already has the mindset that buying women/girls is not OK. It has been very effective. Both Canada and Ireland are in the process of implementing these laws. We would love to see it happen in America.

Terry Forliti, Systems Analyst & Volunteer Manager. In addition to being a survivor of many forms of sexual, physical and emotional abuse, Terry focused on empowerment of the marginalized while obtaining her degree in Organizational Leadership from Bethel University in 2006. Terry served on the Board of Directors of Breaking Free, which assists women in leaving the sex trade, and was eventually hired as staff.


May 10 – Parenting and Grace (Mothers Day)

The great theologian Paul Tillich once described grace as that thing which breaks into our lives and surprises us into wholeness. We are struck alive like a bell awakened with sound and purpose, and we ring with a new pattern. Today we explore the intersection of Parenting and Grace. What might it mean to parent and nurture our relationships with our children and parents with grace? How might we welcome grace into these joyful, challenging and sometimes difficult relationships. Could grace also make space for us to investigate stories that might otherwise get lost in the Hallmark holiday of Mother’s Day? Andrea Johnson is pursuing her Master of Divinity degree at United Theological Seminary in New Brighton, MN. She is a member of First Universalist Church in Minneapolis where she is active on the Pastoral Care Team, facilitating small groups and becoming a Racial Justice trainer. She lives in Minneapolis.


May 3 – Last Year’s Elections – How are they going for us?

David Schultz teaches election law at Hamline University. He is an author, a Fulbright Scholar, who has taught extensively in Europe and is a national award winner for public affairs teaching. Many of us know him from Public Television’s Almanac program. He returns to Pilgrim House to discuss the election in 2014 and a new configuration of government both at the state and national level. David will use his experience and insight to let us know what it all means for each of us individually and as a group.


April 26 – Music of the Civil War and Mid 19th Century

Both Bill Rohde and Mel Aanerud saw a performance of the New Pearl Buttons Band at the Minnesota Historical Society. Individually, they concluded that we should get this group to perform at Pilgrim House. New Pearl Buttons Band is a three piece group that plays Civil War and mid-19th Century American music and are the house band at the LeDuc Historic Estate in Hastings.


April 19 – Exploding the Myths Around Gun Violence

Protect Minnesota has worked to End Gun Violence and has been the organization at the forefront of legislative efforts against gun violence, such as the defeat of the Stand Your Ground/Shoot First bill in Minnesota and the passage of a bill in 2014 to keep guns out of the hands of domestic abusers. Since 2010, Protect Minnesota has organized youth violence prevention programs and worked to change the narrative around gun violence.

Presented by Mary Lewis Grow.


April 12 – Immigration

Immigration is a topic that the Unitarian Universalist Association has asked us to explore. We began discussion of immigration policy with Alberto Monserrate who is Co-Founder and President of the Minnesota Latino Communications Network in January. On April 12th we will have another perspective from Bill Blazar of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce, who contends that immigration is a positive when we look at the financial and business considerations.


April 5 – Spring Celebration with guest minister Laura Thompson

Spring Cleaning, Bunnies and Resurrection: An exploration of the themes of spring rituals and holy days. What meaning do they bring to our lives?

Laura Thompson is a UU candidate for ministry. She is currently a chaplain resident at United Hospital and recently completed her M.Div at United Theological Seminary. Laura has previously spoken at First Unitarian Society, Unitarian Church of Underwood, Dakota UU Church, UU Church of Fargo Moorhead and UU Church of Minnetonka. She makes her home in St. Paul with her wife, Emily.

Following the program will be Soup Sunday with a potluck brunch of finger foods.


March 29 – Meditation and Mindfulness

Meditation and Mindfulness: These terms and these practices are showing up all around us today. What are they really about and what is their relevance for the spiritual life of a modern Unitarian Universalist?

We’ll consider the roots of these practices in the Zen Buddhist tradition. We’ll take a careful look at that phenomenon so elusive in our culture: silence. What of the deeper silence beyond the absence of noise, the silence of a still mind? We’ll consider meditation practice in the context of the Three Trainings common to many schools of Buddhism: meditation, insight into the deeply interdependent nature of reality, and morality, our responsibility for ethical behavior. And we’ll turn to outer and inner silence in some meditation practice.

Kenneth Ford is a lay teacher at Clouds in Water Zen Center in St. Paul who has recently received transmission in the lineage of his original teacher, Dainin Katagiri, the founding abbot of Soto Zen practice in Minnesota. In addition to his teaching roles, Ken currently leads a meditation group at Unity Church-Unitarian in St. Paul.


March 22 – Jazz and the Spirit

In a “mostly music” service, saxophonist/writer Richard Terrill and pianist Larry McDonough will talk about the spiritual dimension of music and of jazz improvisation. They will perform a selection of familiar tunes and original compositions, including some not usually heard in the jazz idiom, such as “Simple Gifts,” “God Bless America,” and “We Shall Overcome.”


March 15 – Advocating for Minnesota’s Housing Continuum

Some 14,000 Minnesotans are homeless on any given night and 13,000 school children lack stable housing. The expansion of housing options and economic opportunity is the most humane and cost-effective approach to addressing homelessness. This will promote better health, education, and economic outcomes. This presentation will focus on what makes a housing continuum and why it’s important to invest in it.

The speaker, Dan Kitzberger, Policy Director, of Minnesota Coalition for the Homeless, has experience as a researcher, organizer, and advocate in a variety of nonprofit organizations including the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, Association for Nonsmokers, and Neighborhood Housing Services.


March 8 - World War I, 100th Anniversary

Kim Munholland, Professor Emeritus University of Minnesota. The 100th anniversary of the war leads us to ask what led to the war and if we have any parallels today.


March 1 – Invisible Children

Presented by Mike Tikkanen and Tiffini Flynn Forslund. Mike has been a volunteer county guardian ad-Litem since 1996. He is also a CASAMN board member & founder of KARA, Kids At Risk Action with a mission to speak for the rights and awareness of abused and neglected children. KARA’s current project is a television documentary/expose with TPT. By generating conversation and exposing facts that many are afraid or unable to speak about, Mike brings attention to the critical issues facing abused & neglected children. Mike identifies the problems children, schools, and neighborhoods face daily because of poor public policy and the dysfunction created by lack of awareness within our community. The KARA website is http://www.invisiblechildren.org.

Following the program is Soup Sunday and the Annual PH Auction.


February 22 - Teddy Roosevelt

Adam Lindquist is Teddy Roosevelt and presents a program in Roosevelt’s own words. Teddy Roosevelt was the nation’s youngest president and one of the faces on Mount Rushmore. Environmentalist, but also an advocate for empire.


February 15 - Inner Technology

Presented by Cindi Claypatch.

Understanding the inside out nature of experience via the gifts of Divine Mind, Consciousness and Thought helps us to connect to and identify with our spiritual essence. When connected to our formless essence, our core health takes shape as wisdom, intuition, good judgement, love, common sense resilience..... we live life with less effort and become more grounded. From this place we can radiate our energy, feel inspired and be grounded change agents in our worlds.


February 8 - Transportation in the Twin Cities

Forecast of what is planned, what is hoped for and how individuals can help to make it happen. Presented by Mark Filipi, Manager of Technical Support for the Metropolitan Council.


February 1 – Minnesota and the War of 1812

This program is presented by Pilgrim House member Paul Gardner who is the local president of the Society of the War of 1812. Although no battles were fought in Minnesota, the treaties that ended the war finalized and demilitarized the border with Canada, resulting in two centuries of peace and prosperity with our neighbor. It is the 200th anniversary of the war. For more information go to http://www.minnesota1812.org.

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